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This topic contains 5 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  BT Nutritionist 1 month, 1 week ago.

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  • #80090

    joanne.thomson42
    Participant

    I have just started on Day 1 of the 12 week programme and was extremely surprised to see the fat content of your shake is 35%. This seems excessively high to me?? Can you explain why this is.

  • #80175

    joanne.thomson42
    Participant

    Hi BT Nutritionist

    I have also discovered after having my 3 shakes today that my sugar quantity is almost 20% higher than my daily intake should be. Considering you state that Day 1 is removing sugar from the diet I find this quite alarming. I am aware that you state there is sugar to aid with the energy levels, but to be consuming 20% more in a day doesn’t seem the right way to lose weight.

    I would appreciate your input to this. I am intending continuing with the plan at present, as am now interested to see if there is any result.

  • #80207

    BT Nutritionist
    Keymaster

    Hi Joanne,

    The meal replacement shakes contain 8.7- 8.9g of total fat per 55g serve. This equates to 15.8- 16.2g of total fat per 100g which could also be read as a 15.8- 16.2% total fat content.
    The saturated fat content is 5.2- 5.4g per 55g serve and this equates to 9.5- 9.8g of saturated fat per 100g (or a 9.5- 9.8% saturated fat content).
    It’s the saturated fat content we need to keep an eye on in terms of heart health.

    Hopefully this sounds a little better?

    Kindest Regards,

    BT Nutritionist 🙂

  • #80220

    BT Nutritionist
    Keymaster

    The shakes do contain a higher sugar content yes.
    Not all of the sugar listed on the label is ‘added’ sugars (the ones we are specifically advised to cut back on). The majority of the total sugar content is naturally occurring milk sugar (you will get this same milk sugar if you were to drink a glass of milk).
    Naturally occurring sugars are those found in whole, unprocessed foods such as fruits, vegetable, dairy and some grains. While natural sugars are still sugar, it does not have quite the same effect as added sugar- the foods they come from do contain many other beneficial nutrients and a healthy and well- balanced diet will contain some natural sugars from these types of foods.
    The shakes do contain a small amount of added sugars, about 3g per serve.

    Kindest Regards,

    BT Nutritionist 🙂

  • #84095

    bentbananabooks
    Participant

    Has BodyTrim considered adding erythritol in place of raw or refined sucrose? I guess it would be more expensive but perhaps not excessive;y so. From my reading on sugar substitutes, erythritol sounds the healthiest.
    However as a point of reference BodyTrom has less sugars than most of its competitors.

  • #84152

    BT Nutritionist
    Keymaster

    Hi there!

    As the Bodytrim shakes are Meal Replacements they do need to contain a certain amount of energy/calories so as to provide the body with some sustenance. In fact, legally there is a certain amount of calories a product must contain for it to be labelled and sold as a ‘Formulated Meal Replacement’.
    Calories come from protein, carbohydrates (includes sugar), fat and alcohol. The Bodytrim shakes do not contain alcohol, so to make up the calories required to produce a meal replacement shake we need to utilise and find a balance of protein, carbohydrates and fats.

    As you have found, most- if not all formulated meal replacement products do contain a higher amount of carbohydrates and sugars, and if they didn’t there would need to be more calories coming from protein and/or fats (the protein and/or fat content would be higher instead). Too much fat is not ideal and the same goes for protein.

    In terms of the Bodytrim shakes, the milk ingredients Whole Milk Powder, Skim Milk Powder and Whey Protein Concentrate each contribute sugar in the form of lactose (naturally occurring milk sugar). The majority of sugars in the Bodytrim shakes is coming from these milk ingredients rather than added sugars, although there is a small amount of added sugar in the formula also.

    I like your thinking on the Erythritol! Erythritol is a low calorie sweetener, so unfortunately the addition of this as a sweetener will not do much to contribute to the energy content of the product. We will definitely pass your suggestion onto our Product Development Team though as perhaps there may be another way around this.

    Kindest Regards,

    BT Nutritionist 🙂

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